Lee Goller

Beginning her formal tertiary education in 1982, Lee Goller has extensive experience in the field of ceramics. Of note, Lee has been a finalist in the Mannigham Ceramic Award in 2016. Locally in both Torquay and Jan Juc, Lee’s involvement can be seen publicly in ceramic murals in both Torquay and Jan Juc.

This group of vessel forms celebrates my connection to the coastline and waters in the area where I live, in bayside Beaumaris, with its contrasts of sea and sky, sandy beaches, protected rocky reefs and rockpools, and the hidden world beneath the water.  I swim and snorkel among the reefs, and walk over the rocks in these marvellous surroundings.

 

The objects are wheel-thrown and fired in reduction to give a sense of muted colours and subtle textures. Multiple glazes have been poured and painted, and clay slips have been layered and scratched through and inlaid into the clay surfaces. The kilns and studios where I produce and fire my work are at Clarinda Clayworkers, and School of Clay Art in Brunswick.

 

My major influence is the culture of pictorial vessel pots of ancient cultures, a passion passed on to me by my mother (Raie), who late in life developed a passion for clay, which is shared with my ceramic artist daughter, Kirsty.

 

This group of vessel forms celebrates my connection to the coastline and waters in the area where I live, in bayside Beaumaris, with its contrasts of sea and sky, sandy beaches, protected rocky reefs and rockpools, and the hidden world beneath the water.  I swim and snorkel among the reefs, and walk over the rocks in these marvellous surroundings.

The objects are wheel-thrown and fired in reduction to give a sense of muted colours and subtle textures. Multiple glazes have been poured and painted, and clay slips have been layered and scratched through and inlaid into the clay surfaces. The kilns and studios where I produce and fire my work are at Clarinda Clayworkers, and School of Clay Art in Brunswick.

My major influence is the culture of pictorial vessel pots of ancient cultures, a passion passed on to me by my mother (Raie), who late in life developed a passion for clay, which is shared with my ceramic artist daughter, Kirsty.